Monday, May 23, 2011

Publicity - Choosing a Postcard Design

This morning's effort is being spent on designing a new postcard for handing out to prospective patrons and students.  A lot of thought needs to go into creating this card.  For example, which image to use?  Trina and I argued over this for awhile, and we finally decided on a boat painting that hasn't yet been sold.  First, boats are popular - people love them almost as much as they do lighthouses.  Second, the painting is available for sale, and having it on the postcard will increase the chance of it selling.  (Sure, it might sell next week - but people like the idea of your being a successful artist.)

There is a reverse side to this card, of course, and it does have all the important information such as websites, phone number, e-mail address and so on.  We're pretty happy with that.  However, we have one last question about the front design - what color to use for the border?

Below are two versions.  To the right of this post you'll see a poll asking which one you prefer.  Let me know by taking the poll!



7 comments:

Cindy Michaud said...

Just curious if you tried the "frame" in black...might make the letters of your name pop and enhance the darks of the painting. Otherwise: 6 of one, half dozen of the other.

digitect said...

Why not let the image be full bleed? A colored frame is distracting, go neutral but prefer none at all.

Michael Chesley Johnson said...

We've tried black before, but it is too strong a color. A lighter version, such as 50% grey, is an option, but we wanted something with color.

Michael Chesley Johnson said...

I've also had someone ask me about a full bleed. We did look at that, but when the card is trimmed by the printer, it would seriously hurt the design - bisect the rock on the lower left, slice off part of the stern.

Barb Diehl said...

Try using the dark green used just below the gunwale (I think that's what it's called). It would pull some color from the center of the painting and give it some depth.

ARTIST-Jan Poynter said...

Painter, framer and designer I am going to suggest another alternative. Choose a "nuetral" (color ie: the mauve/grey of the distant shore) for the surround. That lets the predominant green and peach colors rest in the painting. I have also used photoshop to clone an extra 1/4" edge all around an image to allow for the bleed trim without affecting the composition.

Anonymous said...

The pink makes the boat more important; the blue makes the sand more important. If the piece is really about the boat, then the border should help focus attention on the boat, not the sand.